AJACM 2013 Volume 8 Issue 2 Abstracts

Does Chinese Medicine Consultation Share Features and Effects of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy? Using Traditional Acupuncture as an Example (Zheng, Paterson and Yap)


Case Report: Reflections on Practitioner Confidence in Treating Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy (Grant and Cochrane)

 

Case Report: A Rash in Pregnancy Resolved by Chinese Medicine (McPherson and Cochrane)


(Zheng Z, Paterson C and Yap K). Does Chinese Medicine Consultation Share Features and Effects of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy? Using Traditional Acupuncture as an Example. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):6-15.
Background:  Acupuncture, as part of Chinese medicine (CM), is based on a holistic therapeutic theory. Individualised differential diagnosis is the essence and an integral part of its practice. It leads to an individualised treatment plan. Little research on the nature and effects of the CM consultation has been conducted. Previous studies showed behavioural and cognitive changes after traditional acupuncture treatment. In this article, through a hypothetical case, we illustrated a CM consultation process, examined the changes produced and compared the features between CM consultation and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT). Main text: The two therapies share nine out of eleven features, including five specific factors that took different forms in CM and CBT and four non-specific factors known to partially mediate the relationship between psychological therapies and positive therapeutic outcomes. Although Chinese medicine treatments induce changes in behaviours as well as cognition, CM consultation does not share two essential features of CBT, namely a framework of the interaction between behaviour and cognition and teaching patients how to identify and dispute dysfunctional thoughts. Discussion: CM consultation has CBT-like features and effects. Existing qualitative studies suggest that changes in behaviours and cognition after traditional acupuncture treatment are probably due to the CM consultation process or its combined effect with needling, rather than acupuncture needling alone. This hypothesis provides a new perspective on the contributing factors to acupuncture effect. CBT-like features and effects of traditional acupuncture is underestimated by practitioners and researchers, and need to be taken into consideration in acupuncture trial design and clinical practice.


(Grant LE and Cochrane S). 
Case Report: Reflections on Practitioner Confidence in Treating Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):16-20. 
This case report describes a 25-year-old woman who presented with nausea and vomiting (NVP) in her seventh week of pregnancy. The treatment was not successful overall and resulted in both patient and practitioner losing confidence. The following reflective questions challenged my practice and led to an examination of what makes acupuncture work.

  • Why, after a course of acupuncture, did the nausea and vomiting continue?
  • What led to a loss of confidence in the effectiveness of acupuncture to treat this ailment?

Multiple traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research reviews show some benefit for nausea and dry retching using acupressure and acupuncture, and limited results for vomiting. Despite this, I found that my confidence was undermined by being out of touch with my own inner knowing or Yi. I needed to encourage the patient (‘Laura’) to take more responsibility for her own health and we both needed clarity around the treatment result expected.


(McPherson L and Cochrane S). 
Case Report: A Rash in Pregnancy Resolved by Chinese. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):21-24.
A 21-weeks-pregnant female of South Korean descent presents with itchy skin with red raised papules on much of her torso and limbs. Pathology tests show elevated Alanine transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Diagnosis: rash due to liver and gallbladder damp heat. Treatment: acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. Results: after three sessions the rash and itch had disappeared, the liver function tests returned to normal ranges, and the pregnancy went to full term with the birth of a healthy baby girl.

 

Does Chinese Medicine Consultation Share Features and Effects of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy? Using Traditional Acupuncture as an Example (Zheng, Paterson and Yap)


Case Report: Reflections on Practitioner Confidence in Treating Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy (Grant and Cochrane)

 

Case Report: A Rash in Pregnancy Resolved by Chinese Medicine (McPherson and Cochrane)


(Zheng Z, Paterson C and Yap K). Does Chinese Medicine Consultation Share Features and Effects of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy? Using Traditional Acupuncture as an Example. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):6-15.
Background:  Acupuncture, as part of Chinese medicine (CM), is based on a holistic therapeutic theory. Individualised differential diagnosis is the essence and an integral part of its practice. It leads to an individualised treatment plan. Little research on the nature and effects of the CM consultation has been conducted. Previous studies showed behavioural and cognitive changes after traditional acupuncture treatment. In this article, through a hypothetical case, we illustrated a CM consultation process, examined the changes produced and compared the features between CM consultation and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT). Main text: The two therapies share nine out of eleven features, including five specific factors that took different forms in CM and CBT and four non-specific factors known to partially mediate the relationship between psychological therapies and positive therapeutic outcomes. Although Chinese medicine treatments induce changes in behaviours as well as cognition, CM consultation does not share two essential features of CBT, namely a framework of the interaction between behaviour and cognition and teaching patients how to identify and dispute dysfunctional thoughts. Discussion: CM consultation has CBT-like features and effects. Existing qualitative studies suggest that changes in behaviours and cognition after traditional acupuncture treatment are probably due to the CM consultation process or its combined effect with needling, rather than acupuncture needling alone. This hypothesis provides a new perspective on the contributing factors to acupuncture effect. CBT-like features and effects of traditional acupuncture is underestimated by practitioners and researchers, and need to be taken into consideration in acupuncture trial design and clinical practice.


(Grant LE and Cochrane S). 
Case Report: Reflections on Practitioner Confidence in Treating Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):16-20. 
This case report describes a 25-year-old woman who presented with nausea and vomiting (NVP) in her seventh week of pregnancy. The treatment was not successful overall and resulted in both patient and practitioner losing confidence. The following reflective questions challenged my practice and led to an examination of what makes acupuncture work.

  • Why, after a course of acupuncture, did the nausea and vomiting continue?
  • What led to a loss of confidence in the effectiveness of acupuncture to treat this ailment?

Multiple traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research reviews show some benefit for nausea and dry retching using acupressure and acupuncture, and limited results for vomiting. Despite this, I found that my confidence was undermined by being out of touch with my own inner knowing or Yi. I needed to encourage the patient (‘Laura’) to take more responsibility for her own health and we both needed clarity around the treatment result expected.


(McPherson L and Cochrane S). 
Case Report: A Rash in Pregnancy Resolved by Chinese. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2013;8(2):21-24.
A 21-weeks-pregnant female of South Korean descent presents with itchy skin with red raised papules on much of her torso and limbs. Pathology tests show elevated Alanine transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Diagnosis: rash due to liver and gallbladder damp heat. Treatment: acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. Results: after three sessions the rash and itch had disappeared, the liver function tests returned to normal ranges, and the pregnancy went to full term with the birth of a healthy baby girl.