2014 Volume 9 Issue 1 Abstracts

Acupuncture for the Mental and Emotional Health of Women Undergoing IVF Treatment: A Comprehensive Review 

A Survey of the Socio-Demographics and Practice Characteristics of Members of the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd 


(Grant LE, Cochrane S). Acupuncture for the Mental and Emotional Health of Women Undergoing IVF Treatment: A Comprehensive Review. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2014;9(1):5-12.
One in six Australian couples currently struggle with impaired fertility. In vitro fertilisation (IVF) has become the assisted reproductive technology (ART) of choice. The IVF process has inherent stresses: the invasive procedures; medication; knowledge that it might be the last possibility for pregnancy; and the high cost. Both authors have observed in different settings (one clinical and the other during a clinical trial) that women often reported an improved sense of wellbeing and emotional health due to the acupuncture intervention. This paper summarises the reported benefits of acupuncture treatment for mental and emotional health during IVF identified in published peer-reviewed research papers – both theoretically (pathogenesis and physiology) and clinically (with reference to acupuncture treatment and the therapeutic encounter). The trials reviewed, investigating mental and emotional health during IVF treatment, indicate acupuncture had positive outcomes including: reduced anxiety; reduced stress; less social and relationship concern and improved psychological coping. This paper suggests that reflecting on and valuing the therapeutic alliance, including its collaborative nature, the patient feeling cared for and a perception that practitioners are empathetic, could improve fertility outcomes and the emotional health of infertile women through the process of IVF treatment.

(Zaslawski C, Walsh S, James J & Deare J). A Survey of the Socio-Demographics and Practice Characteristics of Members of the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2014;9(1):13-19.
Background: The Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd (AACMA) is the largest national professional body for Chinese medicine practitioners in Australia yet little is known about specific practice characteristics of its members. Method: In December 2006, a four-page questionnaire was mailed to all association members listed on the AACMA database for that year. The questionnaire sought to obtain information on the demographics and practice characteristics of the AACMA members. In total 1 520 questionnaires were mailed out to the AACMA members, of which 386 were returned. Results: The age distribution for respondents was bimodal, with those in the 46–50 and 31–35 brackets being the highest reported ranges. With regard to education, most respondents stated they had obtained their practice qualifications in Australia (n = 279; 73%), while 46 (12%) replied they had received their qualification from overseas. Most respondents replied that they had obtained a Bachelor degree (n = 207; 54%) while 58 (15%) reported having a Diploma and 37 an Advanced Diploma (9%). Concerning practice characteristics, nearly 70% (n = 268) reported that they practised more than 20 hours per week, with significantly more females working fewer than 20 hours compared to males (p = 0.006). When a breakdown of the pattern of modality use was undertaken, approximately 31% (n = 121) of respondents reported using a combination of both acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, while 20% (n = 77) stated they used acupuncture solely while only 0.5% (n = 2) used herbal medicine alone. The remainder used various combinations involving acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Chinese remedial massage (Tuina) and/or Western remedial massage. Conclusion: This is the first time a survey of members of a particular Chinese medicine (CM) association has been undertaken in Australia. To further develop CM, a large scale survey needs to be undertaken to further define and establish the social demographics and practices of the newly nationally registered CM profession.

Acupuncture for the Mental and Emotional Health of Women Undergoing IVF Treatment: A Comprehensive Review 

A Survey of the Socio-Demographics and Practice Characteristics of Members of the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd 


(Grant LE, Cochrane S). Acupuncture for the Mental and Emotional Health of Women Undergoing IVF Treatment: A Comprehensive Review. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2014;9(1):5-12.
One in six Australian couples currently struggle with impaired fertility. In vitro fertilisation (IVF) has become the assisted reproductive technology (ART) of choice. The IVF process has inherent stresses: the invasive procedures; medication; knowledge that it might be the last possibility for pregnancy; and the high cost. Both authors have observed in different settings (one clinical and the other during a clinical trial) that women often reported an improved sense of wellbeing and emotional health due to the acupuncture intervention. This paper summarises the reported benefits of acupuncture treatment for mental and emotional health during IVF identified in published peer-reviewed research papers – both theoretically (pathogenesis and physiology) and clinically (with reference to acupuncture treatment and the therapeutic encounter). The trials reviewed, investigating mental and emotional health during IVF treatment, indicate acupuncture had positive outcomes including: reduced anxiety; reduced stress; less social and relationship concern and improved psychological coping. This paper suggests that reflecting on and valuing the therapeutic alliance, including its collaborative nature, the patient feeling cared for and a perception that practitioners are empathetic, could improve fertility outcomes and the emotional health of infertile women through the process of IVF treatment.

(Zaslawski C, Walsh S, James J & Deare J). A Survey of the Socio-Demographics and Practice Characteristics of Members of the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2014;9(1):13-19.
Background: The Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd (AACMA) is the largest national professional body for Chinese medicine practitioners in Australia yet little is known about specific practice characteristics of its members. Method: In December 2006, a four-page questionnaire was mailed to all association members listed on the AACMA database for that year. The questionnaire sought to obtain information on the demographics and practice characteristics of the AACMA members. In total 1 520 questionnaires were mailed out to the AACMA members, of which 386 were returned. Results: The age distribution for respondents was bimodal, with those in the 46–50 and 31–35 brackets being the highest reported ranges. With regard to education, most respondents stated they had obtained their practice qualifications in Australia (n = 279; 73%), while 46 (12%) replied they had received their qualification from overseas. Most respondents replied that they had obtained a Bachelor degree (n = 207; 54%) while 58 (15%) reported having a Diploma and 37 an Advanced Diploma (9%). Concerning practice characteristics, nearly 70% (n = 268) reported that they practised more than 20 hours per week, with significantly more females working fewer than 20 hours compared to males (p = 0.006). When a breakdown of the pattern of modality use was undertaken, approximately 31% (n = 121) of respondents reported using a combination of both acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, while 20% (n = 77) stated they used acupuncture solely while only 0.5% (n = 2) used herbal medicine alone. The remainder used various combinations involving acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Chinese remedial massage (Tuina) and/or Western remedial massage. Conclusion: This is the first time a survey of members of a particular Chinese medicine (CM) association has been undertaken in Australia. To further develop CM, a large scale survey needs to be undertaken to further define and establish the social demographics and practices of the newly nationally registered CM profession.