Understanding the Practice of Acupuncture with Women with Fertility Problems: A Qualitative Approach (Cochrane, Smith & Possamai-Inesedy)

A Consumer's Reflections on Traditional Chinese Medicine and Traditional Western Medicine (D'Cruz)

Contextualising the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodologies in Chinese Medicine: Epistemological and Ethical Issues (Moore & Komesaroff)

Narrative and the Evolution of Qi (Ferrigno)


(Cochrane S, Smith C & Possamai-Inesedy A). Understanding the Practice of Acupuncture with Women with Fertility Problems: A Qualitative Approach. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):4-12.
As part of the development of an acupuncture protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to enhance female fertility, experienced practitioners were interviewed to explore what factors they considered to be important components to their acupuncture practice with women with fertility problems. The interviews were wide-ranging and an analysis of the discussion generated a series of questions that were then put to a broader focus group of experts in the field. The extracts of the interviews presented here also raise other issues about how acupuncture is practised and the implications of this for acupuncturists – such as the complexity of the acupuncture therapeutic engagement, the specialist knowledge necessary for work in fertility, and the self-nurturing required by the acupuncturist to sustain practice. More exploration into the nature of acupuncture practice requires increased use of qualitative research methods.

(D'Cruz H).
A Consumer’s Reflections on Traditional Chinese Medicine and Traditional Western Medicine. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):14-20.
This article presents a consumer’s reflections on traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Western medicine, with a particular focus on the processes in the relationship between the practitioner and the consumer. It does not engage with the broader debates about efficacy and ‘scientific validity’. The article aims to show why it is important to listen to patients-as-consumers about their experiences of health services. It is informed by contemporary scholarship that sees consumer participation as an ethical practice, and as essential to compliance with treatment and service effectiveness. The article uses an auto/biographical methodology that is consistent with encouraging consumers’ participation in health and welfare services, and in evaluating interventions beyond narrowly-defined outcomes, experimental designs, and randomised controlled trials. This personal narrative is a reflection on experiences over at least 10 years of receiving health services from practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Western medicine (TWM) in a large regional town in eastern Australia. Differing models of health, intervention, and the relationship between practitioners and consumers, influence individual practitioners’ approaches to consumers. Recommendations are offered on how listening to a consumer’s experiences may improve professional practice in health services.

(Moore A & Komesaroff, P). Contextualising the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodologies in Chinese Medicine: Epistemological & Ethical Issues. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):21-6.
Research into the effects of medical interventions is one of the oldest traditions of any medicine, as is the study of its ethical dimension. In this paper, we briefly describe and recount the history of both quantitative and qualitative methods in clinical research. We discuss key theoretical, methodological and practical features of both methodological perspectives and consider some of the central ideas of medical ethics. We sketch a theory of the relationship between the quantitative and qualitative as essentially complementary and interdependent. The theory is illustrated by reference to the placebo effect and a research ‘case study’ from within the Chinese medicine community.
We conclude that despite the challenges, combined research methodologies in Chinese medicine offer both scientific and ethical benefits.

(Ferrigno, P). Narrative and the Evolution of Qi. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):27-33.
This offering forms part of a larger group of contributions on qualitative or naturalistic inquiry into Chinese medicine ideas and practice. In Chinese medicine, the clinical encounter may be understood as an occasion when matters of the mind and body are articulated and understood as patterns of qi. What is remarkable is how an encounter may be read as an engagement with universal myths, metaphors and symbols situated within a body of medical knowledge called Chinese medicine. Amplifying the patient’s narrative, it is argued, enriches our understanding how qi manifests in the body, offering an insight into states of being. In this paper the idea of the case study, typically used as a way of exploring Chinese medicine ideas, is broadened in scope suggesting that practitioners go beyond the usual inclusion of signs and symptoms and incorporate the narration of everyday life experience as a way of enriching our understanding of Chinese medicine ideas.

Understanding the Practice of Acupuncture with Women with Fertility Problems: A Qualitative Approach (Cochrane, Smith & Possamai-Inesedy)

A Consumer's Reflections on Traditional Chinese Medicine and Traditional Western Medicine (D'Cruz)

Contextualising the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodologies in Chinese Medicine: Epistemological and Ethical Issues (Moore & Komesaroff)

Narrative and the Evolution of Qi (Ferrigno)


(Cochrane S, Smith C & Possamai-Inesedy A). Understanding the Practice of Acupuncture with Women with Fertility Problems: A Qualitative Approach. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):4-12.
As part of the development of an acupuncture protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to enhance female fertility, experienced practitioners were interviewed to explore what factors they considered to be important components to their acupuncture practice with women with fertility problems. The interviews were wide-ranging and an analysis of the discussion generated a series of questions that were then put to a broader focus group of experts in the field. The extracts of the interviews presented here also raise other issues about how acupuncture is practised and the implications of this for acupuncturists – such as the complexity of the acupuncture therapeutic engagement, the specialist knowledge necessary for work in fertility, and the self-nurturing required by the acupuncturist to sustain practice. More exploration into the nature of acupuncture practice requires increased use of qualitative research methods.

(D'Cruz H).
A Consumer’s Reflections on Traditional Chinese Medicine and Traditional Western Medicine. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):14-20.
This article presents a consumer’s reflections on traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Western medicine, with a particular focus on the processes in the relationship between the practitioner and the consumer. It does not engage with the broader debates about efficacy and ‘scientific validity’. The article aims to show why it is important to listen to patients-as-consumers about their experiences of health services. It is informed by contemporary scholarship that sees consumer participation as an ethical practice, and as essential to compliance with treatment and service effectiveness. The article uses an auto/biographical methodology that is consistent with encouraging consumers’ participation in health and welfare services, and in evaluating interventions beyond narrowly-defined outcomes, experimental designs, and randomised controlled trials. This personal narrative is a reflection on experiences over at least 10 years of receiving health services from practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Western medicine (TWM) in a large regional town in eastern Australia. Differing models of health, intervention, and the relationship between practitioners and consumers, influence individual practitioners’ approaches to consumers. Recommendations are offered on how listening to a consumer’s experiences may improve professional practice in health services.

(Moore A & Komesaroff, P). Contextualising the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodologies in Chinese Medicine: Epistemological & Ethical Issues. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):21-6.
Research into the effects of medical interventions is one of the oldest traditions of any medicine, as is the study of its ethical dimension. In this paper, we briefly describe and recount the history of both quantitative and qualitative methods in clinical research. We discuss key theoretical, methodological and practical features of both methodological perspectives and consider some of the central ideas of medical ethics. We sketch a theory of the relationship between the quantitative and qualitative as essentially complementary and interdependent. The theory is illustrated by reference to the placebo effect and a research ‘case study’ from within the Chinese medicine community.
We conclude that despite the challenges, combined research methodologies in Chinese medicine offer both scientific and ethical benefits.

(Ferrigno, P). Narrative and the Evolution of Qi. AUST J Acupunct Chin Med 2012;7(2):27-33.
This offering forms part of a larger group of contributions on qualitative or naturalistic inquiry into Chinese medicine ideas and practice. In Chinese medicine, the clinical encounter may be understood as an occasion when matters of the mind and body are articulated and understood as patterns of qi. What is remarkable is how an encounter may be read as an engagement with universal myths, metaphors and symbols situated within a body of medical knowledge called Chinese medicine. Amplifying the patient’s narrative, it is argued, enriches our understanding how qi manifests in the body, offering an insight into states of being. In this paper the idea of the case study, typically used as a way of exploring Chinese medicine ideas, is broadened in scope suggesting that practitioners go beyond the usual inclusion of signs and symptoms and incorporate the narration of everyday life experience as a way of enriching our understanding of Chinese medicine ideas.

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How to use the Practitioner Search

Use the search feature to the left to find your nearest accredited practitioners.

Search for a practitioner using one or more of the following fields.

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  • Family Name & State
  • Given Name & State

If you would like to locate a post code please visit Australia Post.

To view a map please visit Whereis